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diy-htm:

How To: Make Soda Can Flower Lights

 By: Diy maven  Jul 31, 2012
Last week I showed you how to make a mini window Japanese garden using 3M’s Command Brand Medium Caddy. Today we’re going to reach back into the 3M goodie bag and make soda can flower lights, which we’ll install using their oh-so-handy Clear Decorating Clips. To start our project, we’ll need to gather up the following:
1 - package of Command Clear Decorating Clips
1 - string of clear twinkle lights 
Aluminum soda cans rescued from the recycling bin (The size of your flowers and the number of lights on the string will determine how many you’ll need)
One standard-sized hole punch 
A scissors
A knife with a serrated blade, optional
A paper shaping/die cutting machine (I used a Cuttlebug) and a flower die OR a flower paper punch OR you can cut the flowers by hand
Start by cutting off the top of the soda can with the serrated knife. I find using this kind of knife much easier than getting started with a scissors. (By the way, if you’ve never cut an aluminum soda can, it super easy and there isn’t any sharp edges, really, but if you’re worried about such things, you might want to don a pair of gloves.)Then, using the scissors, cut down the side of the can and cut off the bottom. You’ll end up with something that looks like this: Next, you’ll want to wash your aluminum sheets to get all the sticky, leftover soda off the inside.After you’ve dried your aluminum sheets, cut them into manageable strips that are sized to fit the die/punch you’re using. I cut these large sheets into fours for my project:Now comes the fun part, punching out the flowers. I used a random flower die (about 1-1/2 wide) and my Cuttlebug to do this part, but like I said, you CAN use a regular punch too or even cut them out freehand. If you do use a punch, I wouldn’t use an intricate one like a flower with lots of petals. They’ll just get hung up in your die. Here’s a shot of the die I used coupled with the aluminum strip and the plates you use to ‘sandwich’ them all together.:Then you put the ‘sandwich’ into the Cuttlebug and crank it through. The machine does all the tricky work as it cuts out the image from the aluminum.And here’s what the aluminum looks like after it’s been cut:Now, a warning about using a punch for this project. Here’s a picture of the flower I made next to a tree I made using a standard punch. Notice how the tree has funky edges and the flower’s edges are smooth? That’s the difference between using a die cutter and a punch when punching aluminum. So, keep that in mind if you do go with a punch.Okay, now back to business. Grab your standard hole punch and punch a hole in the center of your flower.Now do that over and over and over again, until you have the same number of flowers as you do bulbs on your string of twinkle lights.Next, grab your string lights and pull out the bulbs. Fit one flower over each bulb. Don’t worry if it’s a snug fit—mine were—just gently push the aluminum up until the flowers are flush with the upper rim of the bulbs. Make sure the leads (those little wires sticking up at the bottom of the bulb) are clear of the aluminum. If they touch the aluminum, don’t worry, they won’t shock you when you turn on the lights, but if the aluminum does touch the leads, you could short out the bulb. So, trim or fold down the leads a bit, if necessary.This is what your soda can lights might look like when they’re all finished. Now, what to do with them? I had planned on putting mine outside, but they were so cute, I decided to install them in my craft room. I can always use the light, plus these will make any project I tackle in there much more joyful.I decided to use them to frame the workspace around my desk, so, using a 4 foot level, I grabbed my sweetie and the clear Clear Decorating Clips and got to work. He held the level while I positioned the clips about a foot apart. This keeps the lights nice and taut so they don’t sag. And here they are, all lit up! Now, you could slip the flowers on the bulbs printed side out for some color, but I LOVE how the light bounces off that lovely aluminum. Another great thing about using aluminum is if you DID use them outside, the aluminum is impervious to the elements unlike, say, paper flowers or cupcake liners. Again, what’s great about these new clear Command products is that the adhesive strips are clear so you don’t see those white tabs sticking out. Imperative for such an installation!

diy-htm:

How To: Make Soda Can Flower Lights

By: Diy maven Jul 31, 2012

created at: 07/31/2012
Last week I showed you how to make a mini window Japanese garden using 3M’s Command Brand Medium Caddy. Today we’re going to reach back into the 3M goodie bag and make soda can flower lights, which we’ll install using their oh-so-handy Clear Decorating Clips

To start our project, we’ll need to gather up the following:

  • 1 - package of Command Clear Decorating Clips
  • 1 - string of clear twinkle lights 
  • Aluminum soda cans rescued from the recycling bin (The size of your flowers and the number of lights on the string will determine how many you’ll need)
  • One standard-sized hole punch 
  • A scissors
  • A knife with a serrated blade, optional
  • A paper shaping/die cutting machine (I used a Cuttlebug) and a flower die OR a flower paper punch OR you can cut the flowers by hand

Start by cutting off the top of the soda can with the serrated knife. I find using this kind of knife much easier than getting started with a scissors. (By the way, if you’ve never cut an aluminum soda can, it super easy and there isn’t any sharp edges, really, but if you’re worried about such things, you might want to don a pair of gloves.)
created at: 07/30/2012
Then, using the scissors, cut down the side of the can and cut off the bottom. You’ll end up with something that looks like this: 
created at: 07/29/2012
Next, you’ll want to wash your aluminum sheets to get all the sticky, leftover soda off the inside.
created at: 07/30/2012
After you’ve dried your aluminum sheets, cut them into manageable strips that are sized to fit the die/punch you’re using. I cut these large sheets into fours for my project:
created at: 07/30/2012
Now comes the fun part, punching out the flowers. I used a random flower die (about 1-1/2 wide) and my Cuttlebug to do this part, but like I said, you CAN use a regular punch too or even cut them out freehand. If you do use a punch, I wouldn’t use an intricate one like a flower with lots of petals. They’ll just get hung up in your die. 

Here’s a shot of the die I used coupled with the aluminum strip and the plates you use to ‘sandwich’ them all together.:
created at: 07/30/2012
Then you put the ‘sandwich’ into the Cuttlebug and crank it through. The machine does all the tricky work as it cuts out the image from the aluminum.
created at: 07/30/2012
And here’s what the aluminum looks like after it’s been cut:
created at: 07/30/2012
Now, a warning about using a punch for this project. Here’s a picture of the flower I made next to a tree I made using a standard punch. Notice how the tree has funky edges and the flower’s edges are smooth? That’s the difference between using a die cutter and a punch when punching aluminum. So, keep that in mind if you do go with a punch.
created at: 07/30/2012
Okay, now back to business. Grab your standard hole punch and punch a hole in the center of your flower.
created at: 07/30/2012
Now do that over and over and over again, until you have the same number of flowers as you do bulbs on your string of twinkle lights.
created at: 07/30/2012
Next, grab your string lights and pull out the bulbs. Fit one flower over each bulb. Don’t worry if it’s a snug fit—mine were—just gently push the aluminum up until the flowers are flush with the upper rim of the bulbs. Make sure the leads (those little wires sticking up at the bottom of the bulb) are clear of the aluminum. If they touch the aluminum, don’t worry, they won’t shock you when you turn on the lights, but if the aluminum does touch the leads, you could short out the bulb. So, trim or fold down the leads a bit, if necessary.
created at: 07/31/2012
This is what your soda can lights might look like when they’re all finished. Now, what to do with them? I had planned on putting mine outside, but they were so cute, I decided to install them in my craft room. I can always use the light, plus these will make any project I tackle in there much more joyful.
created at: 07/30/2012
I decided to use them to frame the workspace around my desk, so, using a 4 foot level, I grabbed my sweetie and the clear Clear Decorating Clips and got to work. He held the level while I positioned the clips about a foot apart. This keeps the lights nice and taut so they don’t sag. 
created at: 07/31/2012
And here they are, all lit up! Now, you could slip the flowers on the bulbs printed side out for some color, but I LOVE how the light bounces off that lovely aluminum. Another great thing about using aluminum is if you DID use them outside, the aluminum is impervious to the elements unlike, say, paper flowers or cupcake liners. 
created at: 07/31/2012
Again, what’s great about these new clear Command products is that the adhesive strips are clear so you don’t see those white tabs sticking out. Imperative for such an installation!
created at: 07/31/2012

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